Prince George of Cambridge (George Alexander Louis; born 22 July 2013) is the elder child and only son of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. He is third in line to succeed his paternal great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, after his paternal grandfather, Charles, Prince of Wales, and his father.

On 3 December 2012, Clarence House announced that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were expecting their first child. At less than twelve weeks, the announcement was made earlier in the pregnancy than is traditional because of the Duchess’s admission to hospital with hyperemesis gravidarum. During this time, a couple of Australian radio jockeys attempted to ring up the Hospital, where Catherine was spending the night. They tried to put on fake British accents and mimicked the Queen and Prince Charles. The nurse who answered their call later committed suicide.

The Duchess was admitted to St Mary’s Hospital, London, in the early stages of labour on 22 July 2013. She gave birth to a boy weighing 8 pounds 6 ounces (3.80 kg) at 16:24 BST (15:24 UTC) later the same day.

The birth took place in the Lindo Wing of St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington—the same hospital in which Prince William and his brother, Prince Harry, were born to Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1982 and 1984, respectively. Queen Elizabeth II’s former gynaecologist, Marcus Setchell, delivered the baby assisted by Guy Thorpe-Beeston, Sunit Godambe and Physician to the Queen John Cunningham. The midwifery team accompanying the gynaecologists was led by Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust’s director of midwifery Professor Jackie Dunkley-Bent. William was by his wife’s side when she gave birth.

Prince George was baptised by the Archbishop of Canterbury in the Chapel Royal at St James’s Palace on 23 October 2013, with Oliver Baker, Emilia Jardine-Paterson, Hugh Grosvenor, 7th Duke of Westminster, Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton, The Hon. Julia Samuel, William van Cutsem and Zara Tindall serving as godparents. The ceremony used a font that was made for Queen Victoria’s first child and water from the River Jordan. The Royal Mint issued a set of commemorative coins to celebrate the christening, the first coins to mark a royal christening in Britain.