Nurse investigated over $1m will payout

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Lionel Cox died in August last year. In his will, he gave everything to Abha Anuradha Kumar, who managed aged care facility Cambridge House, where Mr Cox spent his dying days.

Ms Kumar received Mr Cox’s $900,000 estate and $36,000 in cash and other items.

But a copy of Mr Cox’s will, obtained by Fairfax, shows the 92-year-old had real trouble filling out the most basic details, including his name, address, postcode and state.

On the official document, Mr Cox writes his surname twice and has three attempts at spelling Fitzroy, the suburb he lived in.

He crosses out the postcode “3065” then writes it again on the line below. In the section that asks him to declare the state and territory he lives in, he starts with an “O” then crosses that out and writes the word “Victoria” over two lines.
Below, he makes not a single error when spelling out “Abha Kumar” and “Cambridge House”.
The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia is investigating the circumstances around the will but the board refused to comment while the investigation is continuing.
The Age reports Mr Cox died on August 9 from organ failure as a result of pneumonia and Ms Kumar attended his funeral along with several family and friends.

A neighbour, John, said he found it “impossible” to believe Mr Cox would leave his entire estate to one individual when he previously expressed his desire to donate the money to several charities.
Individuals have left their fortune to nurses before after forming bonds during their time of greatest need. But the money doesn’t always end up where the deceased wants it to end up.
In one of the most well-known cases, New York millionaire Haguette Clark left her $33 million fortune to her caretaker, nurse Hadassah Peri.
In that example, Mr Peri, of Filipino descent, cared for the copper heiress for 20 years. The mother-of-three received five properties including a three-storey home at Manhattan Beach and another at Jersey Shore.
She also received three cars including a Bentley and a Lincoln Navigator. She explained what it was like working for the woman who handed over her fortune.
“For almost 14 years I stayed more in Madame’s room than in my house,” Ms Peri told an inquiry into Ms Clark’s estate.

“I work 12 hours… My husband is a mother and father while I’m working with Madame. Family vacation I miss when the kids were growing up. Because she never wants me to take off. She is uncomfortable with other people.”

Soon after being named the sole beneficiary, relatives of Ms Clark intervened and the money went in a different direction.

Nineteen of Ms Clark’s relatives made a claim to her fortune, saying the woman who died aged 104 was not lucid when she cut them out of a second will in 2011.

A settlement in the case resulted in Ms Peri giving back the millions, Mail Onlinereported. The investigation into Mr Cox’s estate is continuing.

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