Australia needs a Serious Fraud and Corruption Office to tackle corporate crime and building industry rorts, the nation’s leading anti-corruption group has said. In a bid to resolve the political impasse over the Turnbull government’s proposed building industry reforms, Transparency International Australia (TIA) is pushing for the creation of a new crime-fighting agency to take over the Australian Federal Police’s responsibility for investigating fraud and corruption and do the work of the proposed Building and Construction Commission.

TIA chair Anthony Whealy, QC, also said Federal Parliament needed to implement a national integrity commission and parliamentary integrity commissioner to police public-sector corruption.

Federal politicians from both major parties have long resisted calls for a national public-sector anti-corruption agency, claiming state-based bodies such as the NSW ICAC were adequate and that federal MPs and public servants had traditionally had fewer corruption problems than their state-based counterparts.

Australia needs a Serious Fraud and Corruption Office to tackle corporate crime and building industry rorts, the nation’s leading anti-corruption group has said.

In a bid to resolve the political impasse over the Turnbull government’s proposed building industry reforms, Transparency International Australia (TIA) is pushing for the creation of a new crime-fighting agency to take over the Australian Federal Police’s responsibility for investigating fraud and corruption and do the work of the proposed Building and Construction Commission.

TIA chair Anthony Whealy, QC, also said Federal Parliament needed to implement a national integrity commission and parliamentary integrity commissioner to police public-sector corruption.

Federal politicians from both major parties have long resisted calls for a national public-sector anti-corruption agency, claiming state-based bodies such as the NSW ICAC were adequate and that federal MPs and public servants had traditionally had fewer corruption problems than their state-based counterparts.