A sixth man is in custody over the so-called “terror tinnie” case, accused of buying a boat five other Melbourne men allegedly planned to use to flee Australia to join Islamic State.
Islamic preacher Musa Cerantonio, Shayden Thorne, Kadir Kaya, Antonio Granata and Paul Dacre were arrested near Cairns last week towing a seven-metre vessel en route to Cape York.
Police allege the five men planned to travel by boat to Indonesia and then on to Syria to join IS fighters.
Murat Kaya, 25, was not with them at the time but was arrested after counter-terror raids on Friday morning.
Police allege he bought a car, boat and trailer for the purpose of travelling to northern Queensland from where the group would leave by boat with the intention of entering Syria to fight.
Kaya faces a single charge of making preparations for incursions into foreign countries to engage in hostile activities.
He was kept behind glass for his appearance in Melbourne Magistrate’s Court on Friday, with his lawyer Jessie Smith saying he had not been in custody before.
“He would be vulnerable due to the nature of the charge,” Ms Smith said.
Kaya has been diagnosed with anxiety, she told the court.

His five co-accused faced the Melbourne court last week on the same charge after they were extradited from Queensland with a large security contingent on a specially-chartered plane.
They were kept behind glass for their appearance, as was Kaya, whose lawyer Jessie Smith said had not been in custody before.
“He would be vulnerable due to the nature of the charge,” Ms Smith said.
Kaya has been diagnosed with anxiety, she told the court.
Outside court last week defence lawyer Rob Stary, acting for the five men arrested in Queensland, questioned the motives and tactics of the Australian Federal Police.
Mr Stary asked why the accused were allowed to reach Cairns, given police allege their suspicious behaviour started in Melbourne.
He drew a comparison with the Bali Nine case, where Australian drug smugglers were arrested in Indonesia rather than Australia, even though authorities had suspicions about them at home.
The accused men face a maximum penalty of life in jail if found guilty.
Kaya did not apply for bail on Friday.
All six men have been remanded in custody and will face court again on September 22.